Fables by Jean de La Fontaine

 

town_mouse_and_the_country_mouse_2

The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse by Milo Winter The Aesop for Children (Photo credit: Gutenberg [eBook #19994]

 

The fables listed below are not necessarily an analysis of a fable by La Fontaine. Some are used to speak about current events. I usually list or quote the Aesopian equivalent of a fable by La Fontaine. If so, I use the Perry Index classification, a number, of the corresponding Aesopian fable. There are many versions of Aesopian fables as they have been rewritten by several authors. Marie de France (12th century [Anglo-Norman]) and Jean de La Fontaine (17th century [French]) wrote Aesopian fables, but Jean de La Fontaine made Aesp’s fables La Fontaine’s Fables. If you are looking for versions of a fable, your best guide is Laura Gibbs’ Bestiaria Latina (mythfoklore.net/aesopica). Micheline Walker, PhD, (that’s me) has written posts on several fables. I have explained how mythological animals differ from mythical animals and have named the genres in which animals are featured. I am developing a theory of animals in literature. (See Anthropomorphism and Zoomorphism, currently under review.)

  • The Fox & Crane, or Stork (30 September 2014)
  •  La Fontaine’s Fables Compiled & Walter Crane (25 September 2013)

B

  • La Belette entrée dans un grenier (1.III.17);  A Motif: Getting Stuck in a Hole

C

  • The Cat’s Only Trick, “Le Chat et le Renard” (1.IX.14) (The Cat and the Fox) (10 May 2013)
  • The Cat Metamorphosed into a Maid, by Jean de La Fontaine, “La Chatte métamorphosée en femme” (1.II.18) (20 July 2013)
  • “Le Chêne et le Roseau” (The Oak and the Reed):  the Moral (1.I.22) (28 September 2013)
  • “The Cock and the Pearl,” La Fontaine cont’d (1.I.20), “Le Coq et la Perle” (1.I.20) (10 October 2013)
  • “Le Coq et la Perle” (1.I.20); “The Cock and the Pearl,” La Fontaine cont’d (1.I.20)

D

F

G

H

M      

  • The Man and the Snake, “L’Homme et la Couleuvre” (X.1) (9 November 2011)
  • The Man, the Boy, and the Donkey, You can’t please everyone: Æsop retold, “Le Meunier, son fils, et l’âne” (X.1) (21 March 2012)
  • A Motif: Getting Stuck in a Hole, “La Belette entrée dans un grenier” (III.17) (The Weazel in the Granary) (16 April 2013)
  • Another Motif: The Tail-Fisher, “Le Renard ayant la queue coupée” (V.5) (20 April 2013)
  • The Mouse Metamorphosed into a Maid, by Jean de La Fontaine, “La Souris métamorphosée en fille” (II.18) (30 July 2013)

N

The North Wind and the Sun, “Phébus et Borée” (VI.3) (16 April 2013)

O

  • The Oak Tree and the Reed “Le Chêne et le Roseau,” (I.22) (28 September 2013)
  • “Le Chêne et le Roseau” (The Oak and the Reed):  the Moral (I.22) (28 September 2013)

P

  • “Phébus et Borée” (VI.3) The North Wind and the Sun
  • “La Poule aux œufs d’or” (V.8) The Hen with the Golden Eggs  T
  • The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse, “Le Rat de ville et le Rat des champs”  (I.9) (18 August 2013)
  • The Two Bulls and the Frog ( “… the humble pay the costs”) (II.4) (29 September 2015)
  • The Two Rats, the Fox and Egg: The Soul of Animals, “Les Deux Rats, le Renard, et l’Œuf” (IX. last fable) (15 May 2013)

 

Musée Jean de La Fontaine, Site officiel (toutes les fables FR/EN)
Perry Index (classification of Æsop’s Fables)

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